October News Letter

Beef Steak, Chicken of the Woods and Turkey Tail

Fall has arrived and with it brings the end of the abundant mushroom season. However there are several things still out to be on the look for. I am planning to do a few more walks in October if it works out. This year has been my best yet for walks and I want to thank all those who joined me. The interest in learning is alive and well and thriving in our area for sure. In market news, many markets are planning on winter markets this year and I hope to be a part of those, more information with dates and which markets is coming soon. For now I’m still doing Weaverville and East Asheville on Wednesdays and Fridays. This week I will be at both. As fall and winter set in, it is prime time for me to be out Chaga hunting. I’m fully stocked with all my products, so contact me with any needs or wants you may have. So let’s get into it!

Out this month and pretty much ending the season as a whole are these wonderful mushrooms: Honey, Beefsteak, Chickens, Hens, Blewits, Puffballs, Lions Mane, Turkey Tail, Bears Head Tooth. You will see others as well but these make up the edible treasures. Honey mushrooms are known as the largest living organism on earth, measuring 2.4 miles across in Oregon. Honeys are great tasting, especially the stringy stems. They often grow in clusters and always on wood. They have white spore prints, often with a veil around the stem and sometimes with black hairs on the cap. There are Ringless Honeys, which can be smooth on top and no veil. The Deadly Galerina is the look alike to Honeys, they are smoother on the cap and darker orange color and have dark gills. Honeys have white gills. Miatake, Hen of the Woods are a favorite edible of mine taste wise. They are also wonderful medicine, as is Lions Mane. The Bears Head Tooth mushroom taste very similar to Lions Mane and it’s medicinal properties are showing promise much the same as Lions Mane. Blewits and Chickens should stick around through the month and one not pictured here is the Fall Oyster, sometimes called Golden Oysters, which I have found in the winter months before. Here’s a helpful link having to do with Honey mushrooms with a few recipes included: https://foragerchef.com/honey-mushrooms-the-pride-of-eastern-europe/

I want to take a minute and thank everyone who supports what I do….I am grateful to each of you!! I have met so many wonderful people through this work and feel blessed not only to share my passion but live it everyday. Enjoy the changing days and embrace the fall, it’s a pretty season in these mountains and it’s last chance to gather some mushrooms for awhile.

September Newsletter

Summer has had it’s glorious season for this crazy year and is winding down, welcoming in fall. This year in mushroom foraging has been an abundant one. The Morals were great, followed by an amazing Reishi bounty, Chicken of the Woods and Chanterelles didn’t disappoint, so what’s next? Fall will see some of the best varieties popping out. Before I talk about those I’d like to give some updates……

The markets are still going strong and to finish August I’ll be doing this Fridays market at East Asheville. From 3-6pm at 954 Tunnel rd., Groce United Methodist church. I won’t be back at this market until the end of September. I will be at the Weaverville market on September 2nd, which is from 2:30-6pm at Reems Creek Nursery, 76 Monticello Rd. I’ll return to that market at the end of the month. September will be my last month for mushroom walks for the year and I will try to get some in at the end of the month. Contact me either by phone or email to set one up!

****I’ll be out of town until the 22nd of September, so won’t be able to schedule any walks or fill any orders until then. *****

The fall mushrooms are arriving! Turkey Tail is full swing and to me one of the most important mushrooms in the forest. Turkey Tail is a powerful cancer fighter, immune booster and aids in digestion. Simply making a tea out of this mushroom will benefit you greatly. I make tinctures from turkey Tail as well. you can real Turkey tail from the false by looking at the bottom of it, it’ll be white and almost like a sandpaper on the bottom. Here is a good article on it: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/turkey-tail-mushroom

Another highly medicinal mushroom popping out is Lions Mane. It’s hard to mistake this mushroom for any other. It’s toothed, solid white and most often found on dying or dead trees. Lions Mane has a seafood flavor and tastes great, besides that it is a powerful medicine, good for your heart, immune system and most especially your brain health! Keeping with the medicinal ‘shrooms, Maitake, Hen of the Woods or the dancing mushroom, is yet another fall specimen. Maitake is like Turkey Tail and Lions Mane is great for boosting your immune system, helps combat diabetes, lowers cholesterol and lowers blood pressure. It’s a cancer fighter and fights infections, making it an important mushroom in these times of viruses. Plus it tastes great!

Chicken of the Wood will be around for another few months, as well as Oysters, which see a late fall, golden colored variety. Boletes are still around a bit longer and Chanterelles are winding down. The Blue Indigo milk caps, a personal favorite, are unmistakable and out in full force right now. This month will see Puffballs emerge, open them up, if white inside they are good to eat, if any other color throw them out! There is also a Giant Puffball which grow quite large. Lastly is the Honey mushroom. There are two varieties, the ringed and ringless Honeys. They can be smooth on the cap or speckled and the ringed get a distinct veil on the stem. Identifying Honey mushrooms can be easy, but it’s a see it, touch it, smell it kind of thing. I recommend people get out on a walk with an expert to be sure. There is a toxic look alike called the Deadly Galerina that is quite similar, but looking at them side by side in the forest you’d see the big differences. Honeys are a choice edible, with the stringy stems being some of the best parts.

As always I have a full stock of my medicinal tinctures and dried mushrooms for tea making available. Welcome in fall by getting out and enjoying the cooler weather and do some mushroom hunting!

August Newsletter

Looking Glass Rock

Well friends and fellow mushroom people, the summer seems to be moving fast as we enter the last month of it. However that doesn’t mean the end of mushroom abundance! As the seasons change so do the different types of mushrooms that are growing. As every year is different in the mushroom world, this year has seen a blast of Reishi come on, a strange Chanterelle showing and lots of Milky and Bolete mushrooms as usual. Part of the fun of the hunt is never knowing what you’ll find, I’ve visited spots that were abundant every year that have been slightly barren this year and I have also found new spots that were flourishing. It’s always interesting to observe and record, to be caught off guard and to find just what your looking for at the exact time your looking for it. For example I had a memory pop up on my photo stream from a year ago of Lobster mushrooms, I went to the spot and sure enough there they were! This is a general, great rule, that when you find mushrooms like Chicken of the Wood or Chanterelles in a spot, remember that because the next year they will return to that very spot. I’ve been selling quite a bit of fresh picked wild mushrooms, especially Chanterelles, if you’d like some contact me by phone or email, I have a list of people to notify when I have fresh ones, if you’d like to be on that list let me know, plenty of time in the season still to add some wild mushrooms to your dinner!

***I deliver if local to Asheville area, also willing to meet in between if not too far***

I’ve had a great time leading walks this year so far and plan to continue through the fall as mushrooms like Honeys, Hen of the Wood and Lions Mane begin to grow. It’s worked out for those interested in doing a walk to contact me directly via email or by phone, that way I have been able to work with peoples schedules. I will be doing the tailgates as usual, however this month I will be at East Asheville on the 31st of July and then again the 14th and 28th of this month. I’m only doing one Weaverville market on the 19th. I hope to have some fresh Chanterelles and other kinds of wild mushrooms at those markets, as well as my usual medicinal tinctures and dried mushrooms for teas.

Here’s some gems you might find out there right now. All these are edible and tasty in my opinion. I have found the Leather backs are super good on the grill! I cut off the caps and grill those and saute the stems. The Bolete family of mushrooms is a generally safe family, with very few being toxic, however many are bitter tasting. Boletes have no gills instead they have a spongy under bottom and can sometimes change colors when bruised. Although there is edible Boletes that turn blue, I play it safe and stay away from those. Also red bottomed Boletes I stay away from. The Beef Steak is one of the only mushrooms you can eat raw in our woods and tastes great when marinated. The Lobster mushroom is a unique one and actually considered a parasitic mold. It often attaches itself to Russula mushrooms and completely devours it! Often found in piney areas. If you see a mound of pine needles, take a look underneath and you may find a surprise.

Russula (White stem/white gills)

The Corals are also a generally safe family with some exceptions of coarse. Always stay away from yellow corals for one, Corals over all are very hard to digest and the most sought after one is the Crown Tipped Coral, pictured above with tiny crowns on the tips.

Two very wonderful plants/flowers out there right now are these two. Ghost or Indian Pipe is a beautiful wild flower, often likened to the fungi family. It is a special one and should be treated as such both in harvesting practices and dose intake. Here’s a good article on it: https://wisdomoftheplantdevas.com/2019/10/04/ghost-pipe-a-hauntingly-rare-plant-for-physical-and-emotional-pain/

It has been used traditionally for pain relief, help getting to sleep and anxiety issues. The other plant here is one of my favorites to say and hear people repeat, Pipsissewa. This is an obvious Cherokee named plant. Pipsissewa is used in whole plant form, making a tea or tincture from it. It is used for Urinary issues, especially UTIs and bladder stones. It is also useful for anxiety and as an anticancer plant. It gets a pretty little flower as well.

The Queen Reishi

Being such an awesome year for Reishi mushroom I wanted to display this beauty! Found this recently growing solo, it’s a rare thing to find one like this with the distinct stem. It’s said the most medicinal concentration is in that stem. Reishi is said to slow the aging process among a long list of benefits, making it the mushroom of immortality. We’ve had some lovely rain storms this summer so far and recently, making it a wonderland of mushroom love in the forest, get out there, learn and find some wild foraged dinner! Contact me anytime for questions or orders: (828) 423-3875, I respond quicker to texts, or via email at blueridgechaga@gmail.com

July Newsletter

It’s summer and we have entered an exciting month on the mushroom front. These next few months are when the flood gates open. Many of the delicious, colorful and most variety of different mushrooms are popping out! It’s been rainy and the forest is moist, perfect conditions for the hunt. I get excited to do my walks during this time and all this month I will be leading them. It is also important that we spend time outside absorbing the fresh air and vitamin D of the sun during these times. You can sign up under the book now tab. Besides being out picking the wild stuff, I have dove into growing some fresh mushrooms for the markets, I’m currently growing Lions Mane and Gray Dove Oysters. I get my growing blocks from a friend in the mushroom world, his name is Matt and he runs Mayland Mushrooms out in Burnsville. His blocks are top notch and easy to do. I encourage anyone interested in doing it yourself at home to check out his blocks: http://maylandmushrooms.com/

With all the good mushrooms coming out I will have plenty to sell, picking the wild ones has always been a favorite past time for me. This month I will be collecting Chanterelles, Leather Back milk caps, Black Trumpets, Chicken Of The Wood, Beefsteak, Blue Indigo milk caps and some Bolete varieties. All mushrooms are $15 per pound and I sell half pounds as well. For many people mushroom picking is scary and it should be if you haven’t learned enough, or perhaps having the time is a challenge, so let me do it for you! Wild mushrooms make for a great addition to your dinner plate, they can be a way to get creative with your meals. I will have fresh picked mushrooms available at the tailgate markets as well as to order directly from me, if your interested in being on my notice list you can email me. I will send out notifications when I have new stuff straight from the forest. I do caution people to go easy at first, wild mushrooms are harder on our systems to digest, so small portions are a great place to start.

So what’s out there now? Well there’s a lot! The Chicken of the Wood is out and about, Chanterelles have begun to pin and pop, Leatherback Milk Caps, Boletes, Corals, Oysters, Boletes, Puffballs, Russalas and the very prized Chanterelle family, smooth, golden, cinnabar, Black Trumpets, and Appalachian. It’s always a great forage when you find a patch of chants. Really the better question is what’s not out! Above are some of the great edible varieties. I caution everyone not to go solely on pictures when picking on your own, there are many lookalikes out there and plenty of room for error, when in doubt toss it out. Many mushrooms can be turned into jerky very simply, the process is as easy as boiling the mushrooms for about 10 minutes, marinate in a nice sauce of your choosing for 5-6 hours, then dehydrate until mostly dry but still have a chewy consistency and there it is. I enjoy people sharing photos of the different meals they prepare with the mushrooms they buy from me or find on my walks. One of the latest was a friend who came on a walk and we found Cauliflower mushrooms. She made an awesome stir fry with them and shared this photo. I also like to make a nice soup with these ones. Hope to see some new faces out on a walk or at the market this month! Happy hunting ya’ll.